Tag Archives: Dubravka Ugresic

Bulgarian Women Who Run With the Wolves: An Interview with Nataliya Deleva and Izidora Angel

Nataliya Deleva’s Four Minutes is a profound, heart-breaking meditation on the notions of home and homelessness, with their myriad manifestations and implications in our contemporary world. An orphanage in post-communist Bulgaria provides the physical and psychological coordinates of the narrator’s existence and of the book’s loose narrative frame. Called simply and anonymously “the Home,” this […]

Notes from the “Empire of Stupidity”: Dubravka Ugrešić’s “The Age of Skin,” translated from Croatian by Ellen Elias-Bursać

By Ena Selimović On a recent bike ride in East Bay, northern California, I hear a voice from the direction of a foldout chair and turn to see a maskless woman waving a clipboard. She tells her masked audience of two that she is trying to get something added to a local ballot. She repeats, […]

“Scattered words (and scattered worlds)”: Dubravka Ugrešić’s “American Fictionary,” translated from Croatian by Celia Hawkesworth and Ellen Elias-Bursać

By Ena Selimović “This is an indecent book,” Dubravka Ugrešić’s American Fictionary proclaims in a new co-translation by Celia Hawkesworth and Ellen Elias-Bursać, and then continues: I have always believed (and still do) that a writer with any self-respect should avoid three things:  a) autobiography; b) writing about other countries; c) diaries. (7) This proclamation […]