Tag Archives: Literary translation

“Written in Exile: The Poetry of Liu Tsung-Yuan,” Translated from Chinese by Red Pine

By Heather Lang-Cassera Liu Tsung-Yuan has long been acknowledged as one of the most accomplished prose writers of the T’ang Dynasty. However, his excellent poetry was set aside for a time in China—largely because, relative to his prose, he wrote little of it—and it has been wildly under-translated into English. Fortunately, renowned translator Red Pine, […]

Framing by Fragmentation: Elena Ferrante’s “Incidental Inventions,” Translated from Italian by Ann Goldstein

By Stiliana Milkova The timing of Elena Ferrante’s Incidental Inventions is impeccable – it offers us an aperitivo before we can delve into her new novel scheduled to come out in English translation in June 2020. While we wait, we can flip leisurely through the pages of Incidental Inventions, translated from Italian by Ann Goldstein, and already in bookstores. […]

“As Others See Us”: Gabi Reigh on Translating Romanian Literature

Both contributor Gabi Reigh and I come from Eastern Europe. I grew up in Bulgaria. She lived in Romania and moved to the UK at the age of 12. Our literary traditions are little known outside our countries, and are often placed in a position of cultural and geographic marginality. So when I learned about […]

Maelstrom and Mirroring in Edoardo Sanguineti’s “My Life, I Lapped It Up,” translated from Italian by Will Schutt

  By Judith Vollmer All good poems wrestle with acute contradictions.  They sweat and sing the facts and mysteries of living, while simultaneously revealing the scaffoldings and artistic intentions of their surface textures. Sometimes poems sound imitative of traditions they’d rather reject. Sometimes they sound overly self-conscious and merely experimental. But when they’re good—even great—they […]

Edge to Edge: Laura Marris In Conversation With John Taylor and Pierre Chappuis

By Laura Marris Some of us, if we are lucky enough, have witnessed it—the moment when a passing line of clouds tangles with the trees of a ridge, blurring the distinctions between branches and vapor, between landscape and sky. This thoughtful, sensitive volume offers the poetic equivalent of that process, a brush between two imaginative […]

Silvina Ocampo’s Queer Eye: “Forgotten Journey,” translated by Suzanne Jill Levine and Katie Lateef-Jan; and “The Promise,” translated by Levine and Jessica Powell

By Dorothy Potter Snyder Do I contradict myself? Very well then I contradict myself, (I am large, I contain multitudes.) —Walt Whitman, Song of Myself Es tan corto el amor y tan largo el olvido. — Chavela Vargas   Queerness resists definition and finds expression in the manifold array of ways of being and seeing […]

Translators on Books that Should be Translated: “SLOBOŠTINA BARBIE” BY MAŠA KOLANOVIĆ

By Ena Selimović In a review in The Guardian, Ranka Primorac argued that the “best of Croatia’s post-independence writing” challenges what she described as a “dualist (sunny beaches vs. nasty politics, ‘backward’ Croatia vs. ‘modern’ EU) mode of thinking.” Alongside the works of Zoran Ferić and Slavko Goldstein, Maša Kolanović’s Sloboština Barbie exemplified for Primorac […]

Nothing to See Here: Wioletta Greg’s “Accommodations,” Translated from Polish by Jennifer Croft

By Benjamin Paloff After reading Wioletta Greg’s Accommodations, one can be forgiven for wondering whether the novel—not this short novel in particular, but the novel as such, as a literary form—might have exhausted its possibilities. That is no slight against this pleasant, if forgettable, little book, just a pertinent observation about a text in which […]

On Dispersal and Translation: Golan Haji’s “A Tree Whose Name I Don’t Know,” Translated from Arabic by Stephen Watts and Golan Haji

By Ghada Mourad In an interview with Prairie Schooner, Golan Haji, a Kurdish Syrian poet, translator, and pathologist residing in France since 2011, states: “Translation is a process of changing places while you are in the same place […] It’s the stranger who comes to your house, is welcomed, is invited, and you know that […]

Translators on Books that Should be Translated: “Keder” by Yordanka Beleva

By Izidora Angel Keder, like other words in the Bulgarian language, is of Turkish origin. It means sorrow, but also grief and sadness. The story goes that the ancient Turks believed when a person dies, he bestows to his closest forty sorrows, for each of the forty days after death. With each passing day, fewer […]

Reading in Translation

Translations Reviewed by Translators

Christiana Hills

French>English Translator

brouillonjournal.wordpress.com/

Brouillon – the French word for draft – is a place for translators of all languages to explore and examine those endlessly fascinating and infinitely frustrating words, phrases, and motifs that seem impossible to translate. Brouillon is a collection of these moments. Comments and discussion are encouraged.

ELTNA

Emerging Literary Translators' Network in America

immanent occasions

Translations Reviewed by Translators

Linguist Blog

Translations Reviewed by Translators

Transfiction

Translations Reviewed by Translators

HMH Literature in Translation

Translations Reviewed by Translators

ArabLit

Arabic Literature and Translation

Brave New Words

Translations Reviewed by Translators

Translations Reviewed by Translators

Brett Alan Sanders

"Truth is often concealed beneath the surface of an absurdity."

Thoughts On Translation

The translation industry and becoming a translator

a discount ticket to everywhere

thoughts on books, reading and translation

Madam Mayo

Translations Reviewed by Translators

Waiting for Nobel

meanwhile, let's talk about books...

Biblioteca del Instituto Cervantes de Chicago

Blog de la Biblioteca del Instituto Cervantes de Chicago

Translations Reviewed by Translators