Category Spanish

Silvina Ocampo’s Queer Eye: “Forgotten Journey,” translated by Suzanne Jill Levine and Katie Lateef-Jan; and “The Promise,” translated by Levine and Jessica Powell

By Dorothy Potter Snyder Do I contradict myself? Very well then I contradict myself, (I am large, I contain multitudes.) —Walt Whitman, Song of Myself Es tan corto el amor y tan largo el olvido. — Chavela Vargas   Queerness resists definition and finds expression in the manifold array of ways of being and seeing […]

Clinical Erotics in Luis Panini’s “Destruction of the Lover,” Translated from Spanish by Lawrence Schimel

This month, in memory of our contributor Professor Jed Deppman who founded the Oberlin College Translation Symposium, instituted a literary translation minor, and taught courses in literary translation and comparative literature, we are featuring three reviews by Oberlin College Comparative Literature graduates and students, taught and trained by Professor Deppman and other Oberlin College faculty. Professor […]

Light Detained by Bones: Miguel Ángel Bustos’s “Vision of the Children of Evil,” translated from Spanish by Lucina Schell

By Jessica Sequeira  The two books gathered in this 2018 co•im•press translation as Vision of the Children of Evil, translated by Lucina Schell—“Fantastical Fragments” (1965) and “Vision of the Children of Evil” (1967)—were written in the decade before the military coup in Argentina, and it is understandably tempting to view them through a biographical lens. […]

Pablo Neruda Venture of the Infinite Man

“Free falling through the subconscious”: Pablo Neruda’s “venture of the infinite man,” translated from Spanish by Jessica Powell

Reviewed by Arielle Avraham Pablo Neruda (1904-1973) remains one of the best-known South American poets of the 20th century, with copies of his most famous books selling in the millions, and two biographies published about him. His life is the stuff of legend. Born in a rural town in Chile, he began writing poetry as […]

Carmen Berenguer- My Lai

A Scrapbook of “Memorial Clippings”: “My Lai” by Carmen Berenguer, translated from Spanish by Liz Henry

Reviewed by Kelsi Vanada It feels as though the pages of Chilean poet Carmen Berenguer’s My Lai, translated into English by Liz Henry, originated in a scrapbook or journal kept over many years—picked up, loose pages shaken out, and gathered up again quickly and out of order. This sensation is augmented by the inclusion of […]

Baroni: A Journey

Figures from the Mountains: “Baroni: A Journey” by Sergio Chejfec, translated from Spanish by Margaret Carson

Reviewed by Peter Hegarty Baroni: A Journey (2017) concerns Venezuela, where Argentinian writer Sergio Chejfec lived from 1990 to 2005 and where he published Nueva Sociedad, a journal of politics, culture and the social sciences. Gathered in the book, published after he left Venezuela, are his memories of the country, the people and landscapes he […]

Ricardo Piglia-The Diaries of Emilio Renzi

THE LIFE OF HIS OTHER: Ricardo Piglia’s THE DIARIES OF EMILIO RENZI. FORMATIVE YEARS, TRANSLATED BY ROBERT CROLL

Reviewed by Peter Hegarty Argentinian writer Ricardo Emilio Piglia Renzi (1940 – 2017) had two literary identities. Ricardo Piglia wrote operas, screenplays, stories and detective fiction. In the English-speaking world he is probably best-known for Money to Burn (1997), a non-fiction novel inspired, if that is the word, by the violent robbery of a security […]

Cruel Imaginations: The Stories of Mariana Enriquez and Silvina Ocampo

Reviewed by Rebecca DeWald At the Edinburgh International Book Festival last summer, I heard Mariana Enriquez read from her short story collection Things We Lost in the Fire, the first English translation of her work, by Megan McDowell. Twice, in fact: At the official reading, and at a more informal evening event with readings and […]

Eunice Odio-Territory of Dawn

Transparent Hours: Eunice Odio’s Territory of Dawn. Selected Poems, Translated by Keith Ekiss, Sonia P. Ticas, and Mauricio Espinoza

Reviewed by Jessica Sequeira It seems a terrible irony: a poet who primarily dedicated her work to a Beloved, one whose verses seem written with joy and melancholy rather than malice, is born with a surname that means hate. But no, already it’s a mistake to start from signification. Let’s think into this a different […]

I Remember Nightfall-Marosa di Giorgio

Sugar castles: I Remember Nightfall by Marosa di Giorgio, translated by Jeannine Marie Pitas

Reviewed by Jessica Sequeira The poems of Uruguayan writer Marosa di Giorgio (1932 – 2004) are luscious, dark and gorgeous — but they also leave the reader with a sickly taste, an effect similar to that following the rapid consumption of a bag of sticky sweets, gulped down one after another while in thrall to […]

Reading in Translation

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brouillonjournal.wordpress.com/

Brouillon – the French word for draft – is a place for translators of all languages to explore and examine those endlessly fascinating and infinitely frustrating words, phrases, and motifs that seem impossible to translate. Brouillon is a collection of these moments. Comments and discussion are encouraged.

ELTNA

Emerging Literary Translators' Network in America

immanent occasions

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Linguist Blog

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Transfiction

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HMH Literature in Translation

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Brave New Words

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Brett Alan Sanders

"Truth is often concealed beneath the surface of an absurdity."

Thoughts On Translation

The translation industry and becoming a translator

a discount ticket to everywhere

thoughts on books, reading and translation

Madam Mayo

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Waiting for Nobel

meanwhile, let's talk about books...

Biblioteca del Instituto Cervantes de Chicago

Blog de la Biblioteca del Instituto Cervantes de Chicago

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